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The Art of Creative Photography

Top Photography Films - Online Photography Films

Top Photography Films - Online Photography Films

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Thoughts on Photography

Graciela Iturbide: “A Good Excuse To See The World”

Kai Behrmann

Copa para quem - The World Cup for whom - Not all Brazilians are happy with the big soccer tournament being hosted in their country

The Dark Side Of The World Cup In Brazil

Kai Behrmann

On Landscape And Photography Essay by Kyler Zeleny

On Landscape And Photography

Kai Behrmann

5 Reasons Why Film Photography Is Not Old-Fashioned

Kai Behrmann

Roland Barthes: The Photographic Paradox

Kai Behrmann

Non-Fictional Visual Storytelling

Kai Behrmann
Visual storytelling is an essential part of news media. But how did it all start and what is photojournalism?
Read more

John Berger: Ways Of Seeing

Kai Behrmann
Photography has changed our ways of seeing the world. John Berger is a reference when it comes to analyzing visual images.
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Shooting Through A Pinhole

Kai Behrmann
Pinhole photography is a great way to learn about the nature of photography. At the same time it helps to take pictures more consciously.
Read more

Getting started with pinhole photography taking pictures on the streets of Buenos Aires

Experiments With A Pinhole Camera

Kai Behrmann
Building a pinhole camera is easy and at the same time highly educating. It teaches you a lot about the nature of photography. An experiment.
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Train Your Gaze With Henri Cartier-Bresson

Kai Behrmann
Henri Cartier-Bresson is a legend in photography. The French photographer coined the concept of the “decisive moment”.
Read more

Simplicity In Photographic Composition

Photographic Composition Techniques

Kai Behrmann
You can greatly improve your images by following a few basic photographic composition techniques like correct framing, lines or rule of thirds.
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Blow Up: “We See, What We Want To See”

Kai Behrmann
“Blow Up” is a crime story without a crime; a puzzle about the nature of photography.
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Humberto Rivas: Evoking the Past

Kai Behrmann
There is a quality in the images of Humberto Rivas which leave the observer with an idea of a story, that unfolds beyond the frame.
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Humberto Rivas: Photographer Of Silence

Kai Behrmann
Humberto Rivas’ photography may seem trivial, but a closer at his iamges shows that they are well thought compositions of seemingly random scenes.
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Diego Sandstede: Filling The Void…

Kai Behrmann
Talking about his creative process, Argentine photographer Diego Sandstede shows that a project doesn’t always start with a previous idea in mind.
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Nan Goldin: Intimate Snapshots

Kai Behrmann
Nan Goldin confronts the spectator with the harsh reality of New York subculture: Sex, drugs and AIDS – but also great intimacy.
Read more

William Eggleston: Taking Pictures Of The Banal

Kai Behrmann
William Eggleston has shown that the photographer is more important than the subject. His work means a turning point in photography.
Read more

Nicolás Trombetta: Man, Lost in Nature

Kai Behrmann
Nicolás Trombetta is a contemporary Argentine photographer. The main concept and theme that struture his work are the sea, the beach and water.
Read more

Adriana Lestido: Photographs Of The Invisible

Kai Behrmann
Argentine photographer Adriana Lestido talks with Juan Travnik. In that interview she reveals her vision of photography and the way she works.
Read more

The Art of Creative Photography

Online photography magazine providing videos, interviews and essays to promote photographic ideas and stimulate visual creativity.

Who is behind this?

My name is Kai Behrmann. I’m an author and photographer from Germany based in Hamburg.

In 2012 I founded “The Art of Creative Photography” , an online photography magazine to promote photographic creativity and showcase the work of contemporary artists.

If you’d like to have your portfolio featured or have any other question, please get in touch .

My personal work can be seen on www.kaibehrmann.net and www.kaibehrmannphotography.com . If you speak German, please check out my podcast “Gate7” about travel photography .

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  1. Photography

  2. Portraits

Shooting a Photo Essay: Documenting an Event

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Welcome: Shooting a Photo Essay: Documenting an Event
Welcome: Shooting a Photo Essay: Documenting an Event

Welcome: Shooting a Photo Essay: Documenting an Event

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Author

image of author Paul Taggart
Paul Taggart

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Whether you’re photographing your kid’s birthday party, a company event, or a political rally, the right gear and approach can help you capture personalities and special moments. In this course, follow Paul Taggart as he shares techniques for shooting a photo story about an event—in this case, a youth ice sculpting competition in the snowy wilderness of Fairbanks, Alaska. Paul shows how to document the early stages of an event, photograph people and moments at an event in full swing, and wrap up your shoot by capturing the last moments of an event. To wrap up, watch Paul photograph a bonus event—the changing colors of the Aurora Borealis.

Topics include:

  • Documenting the early stages of an event
  • Interviewing an event employee for access and info
  • Photographing people and moments at an event
  • Photo gear tips for a cold weather event
  • Adding final finishing photos for an event story





Skill Level Intermediate

1h 1m

Duration

24,281

Views

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(gentle music)
– Hi, my name’s Paul Taggart, and I’m a photojournalist.
And I’m here in the great state of Alaska,
that’s a photographer’s delight.
We’ve got big nature and big wildlife,
there’s so much to take pictures of here.
But I’m here for the freezing cold temperatures.
Those freezing cold temperatures
enable an ice-sculpting competition here in Fairbank.
People, artists from all over the world come here
and create huge ice sculptures.
But for this course, I’m here to teach you
about how to photograph an event,
and the very specific event we’re going to be shooting
is a youth ice-sculpting competition,
which I think is great.

I think the adult artists are amazing,
but I think, you know, for me as a father,
I’m so often taking pictures of my own children
at their own event, whether they be at school,
or a community event.
So I hope this is going to be more relatable to you at home.
While shooting an event there’s
some very important things to learn.
Strict schedule is going to make or break your event,
but I hope you come with me, watch this course,
and learn how to photograph not only my event that
I’m shooting here, but your events at home.
So put your mittens on, it’s going to be cold.

Resume Transcript Auto-Scroll

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  • Contents
  • Notebook

  • Introduction

    • Welcome

      1m 9s

  • 1. Documenting the Early Stages of an Event

    • Documenting the start of the ice sculpting event

      4m 51s

    • Documenting the end of day one at the ice sculpting event

      6m 30s

    • Getting some early shots as the event begins

      6m 51s

  • 2. Photographing People and Moments at an Event

    • Photographing progress in the ice sculpting event

      3m 48s

    • Photographing moments surrounding the event

      3m 42s

    • Photo gear tips for a cold weather event

      1m 43s

  • 3. Final Finishing Photos for an Event Story

    • Wrapping up the shoot with the last event moments

      4m 34s

    • Final essay

      2m 49s

  • 4. Bonus Event: Photographing the Aurora Borealis

    • Beginning the Aurora Borealis photo shoot

      2m 26s

    • Photographing the Aurora as it continually changes – Part 1

      2m 46s

    • Photographing the Aurora as it continually changes – Part 2

      4m 14s

    • Post shoot edits on Aurora photographs

      16m 7s

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How to Create a Photo Essay

Creating a photo essay is a combination of art and journalism. As with a written essay, the elements of a photo essay should be structured in a way that easily conveys a story to the viewer. Each individual photo contributes to the overall story, theme, and emotions of the essay. The photos you choose must not only be compositionally and artistically strong, but also informative and educational. Finding photos that have both qualities can be very challenging, but the result can be very powerful.

There are two types of photo essays: the narrative and the thematic. The narrative essay tells a story through a sequence of events or actions. They may follow an individual or activity over a period of time and present this story in chronological order. A thematic photo essay focuses on a central theme (e.g. homelessness, the environment, etc.) and presents photos relevant to that theme.
Regardless of what type of photo essay you choose to present, the following elements should be considered during its creation:

  1. The story– Your essay should be able to stand alone, without a written article, and make logical sense to the viewer.
  2. A range of photos: A variety of photos (wide angle, detailed, portraits etc.) should be included. See the types of photos section discussed below.
  3. The order of the photos: It is important that the order of your photos effectively tell a story, in an interesting and logical sequence.
  4. Information and emotion: Your photos should include both informational and emotional photos. Those essays that effectively evoke emotion while providing information tend to convey their messages the best.
  5. Captions: In a photo essay, captions are your best opportunity to describe what is happening in words and ensure that the viewer understands. Include informational content in these captions if necessary.

Types of Photos

By including a variety of types of photos in your essay, you will ensure that it is both interesting and informative. The following types of photos, presented together, can create a successful photo essay. Not only is it important to choose powerful photos, but also to present them in an effective order. While the order of some photos (e.g. the lead photo, and the clincher) is set, the order of most types of photos in your essay is your preference.

The Lead Photo: Similar to the first two sentences of a newspaper article, your lead photo should effectively draw in your audience. This is usually the most difficult photo to choose and should follow the theme of your essay. It could be an emotional portrait or an action shot, but ultimately it should provoke the curiosity of the viewer.

The Scene: Your second photo should set the stage and describe the scene of your story. An overarching photo taken with a wide angle lens is often effective.

The Portraits: Your photo essay should include at least one portrait. Capturing an emotional expression or telling action shot can effectively humanize your story. These photos often evoke strong emotions and empathy in the viewer (whether it is a positive and enthusiastic emotion, or a sympathetic and concerned emotion.)

The Detail Photos: Detail photos focus in on one element, be it a building, a face, or a relevant object. These photos are your best opportunity to capture specific objects. The captions of these photos should be informative and educational.

The Close-up Photos: Similarly, close-up photos provide an opportunity to focus in on specific objects. These photos are tightly cropped, simple shots that present a specific element of your story. Again, this is an excellent opportunity to present information in the caption.

The Signature Photo:The signature photo summarizes the situation and captures the key elements of your story in a telling moment.

The Clincher Photo: The final photo, the clincher, should evoke the emotion you want the viewer to walk away with, be it a feeling of hope, inspiration, or sadness. Decide on this mood before you select this photo.

Remember, these suggestions are only guidelines. Photo essays are a form of art, and like any artistic creation, breaking the rules can sometimes create the most powerful result. Don’t be afraid to try something different.