Cancer-secreted hsa-miR-940 induces an osteoblastic phenotype in … - AdelaminInfo

Cancer-secreted hsa-miR-940 induces an osteoblastic phenotype in …

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Cancer-secreted hsa-miR-940 induces an osteoblastic phenotype in the bone metastatic microenvironment via targeting ARHGAP1 and FAM134A

Kyoko Hashimoto, Hiroki Ochi, Satoko Sunamura, Nobuyoshi Kosaka, Yo Mabuchi, Toru Fukuda, Kenta Yao, Hiroaki Kanda, Keisuke Ae, Atsushi Okawa, Chihiro Akazawa, Takahiro Ochiya, Mitsuru Futakuchi, Shu Takeda, and Shingo Sato
PNAS published ahead of print February 12, 2018 https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1717363115
Kyoko Hashimoto
aDepartment of Physiology and Cell Biology, Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU), Graduate School, 113-8510 Tokyo, Japan;
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Hiroki Ochi
aDepartment of Physiology and Cell Biology, Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU), Graduate School, 113-8510 Tokyo, Japan;
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Satoko Sunamura
aDepartment of Physiology and Cell Biology, Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU), Graduate School, 113-8510 Tokyo, Japan;
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Nobuyoshi Kosaka
bDivision of Molecular and Cellular Medicine, National Cancer Center Research Institute, 104-0045 Tokyo, Japan;
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Yo Mabuchi
cDepartment of Biochemistry and Biophysics, Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU), Graduate School, 113-8510 Tokyo, Japan;
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  • ORCID record for Yo Mabuchi
Toru Fukuda
dDepartment of Food Science, Tokyo Seiei College, 124-8530 Tokyo, Japan;
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Kenta Yao
aDepartment of Physiology and Cell Biology, Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU), Graduate School, 113-8510 Tokyo, Japan;
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Hiroaki Kanda
eDepartment of Pathology, The Cancer Institute of the Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, 135-8550 Tokyo, Japan;
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Keisuke Ae
fDepartment of Orthopaedic Oncology, Cancer Institute Ariake Hospital, 135-8550 Tokyo, Japan;
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Atsushi Okawa
gDepartment of Orthopaedic Surgery, Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU), Graduate School, 113-8510 Tokyo, Japan;
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Chihiro Akazawa
cDepartment of Biochemistry and Biophysics, Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU), Graduate School, 113-8510 Tokyo, Japan;
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Takahiro Ochiya
bDivision of Molecular and Cellular Medicine, National Cancer Center Research Institute, 104-0045 Tokyo, Japan;
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Mitsuru Futakuchi
hDepartment of Pathology, Nagasaki University Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, 852-8523 Nagasaki, Japan;
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Shu Takeda
iDivision of Endocrinology, Toranomon Hospital Endocrine Center, 105-8470 Tokyo, Japan
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  • For correspondence: [email protected]@tmd.ac.jp
Shingo Sato
aDepartment of Physiology and Cell Biology, Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU), Graduate School, 113-8510 Tokyo, Japan;gDepartment of Orthopaedic Surgery, Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU), Graduate School, 113-8510 Tokyo, Japan;
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  • For correspondence: [email protected]@tmd.ac.jp

  1. Edited by Owen N. Witte, Howard Hughes Medical Institute and University of California, Los Angeles, CA, and approved January 12, 2018 (received for review October 3, 2017)

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Significance

Prostate cancer is one of most common cancers in men worldwide, and osteoblastic bone metastasis is frequently observed in prostate cancer patients. However, the mechanisms responsible for the predominantly osteoblastic phenotype have not been fully elucidated. Cancer-secreted microRNAs (miRNAs) were recently shown to be significant in the modification of the tumor microenvironment. Here, hsa-miR-940, which was highly secreted by prostate cancer cells, promoted osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells in vitro, and induced extensive osteoblastic lesions in the bone metastatic microenvironment in vivo. Our study provides a demonstration that osteoblastic bone metastasis can be induced by miRNAs secreted by cancer cells in the bone microenvironment.

Abstract

Bone metastatic lesions are classified as osteoblastic or osteolytic lesions. Prostate and breast cancer patients frequently exhibit osteoblastic-type and osteolytic-type bone metastasis, respectively. In metastatic lesions, tumor cells interact with many different cell types, including osteoblasts, osteoclasts, and mesenchymal stem cells, resulting in an osteoblastic or osteolytic phenotype. However, the mechanisms responsible for the modification of bone remodeling have not been fully elucidated. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are transferred between cells via exosomes and serve as intercellular communication tools, and numerous studies have demonstrated that cancer-secreted miRNAs are capable of modifying the tumor microenvironment. Thus, cancer-secreted miRNAs can induce an osteoblastic or osteolytic phenotype in the bone metastatic microenvironment. In this study, we performed a comprehensive expression analysis of exosomal miRNAs secreted by several human cancer cell lines and identified eight types of human miRNAs that were highly expressed in exosomes from osteoblastic phenotype-inducing prostate cancer cell lines. One of these miRNAs, hsa-miR-940, significantly promoted the osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells in vitro by targeting ARHGAP1 and FAM134A. Interestingly, although MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells are commonly known as an osteolytic phenotype-inducing cancer cell line, the implantation of miR-940–overexpressing MDA-MB-231 cells induced extensive osteoblastic lesions in the resulting tumors by facilitating the osteogenic differentiation of host mesenchymal cells. Our results suggest that the phenotypes of bone metastases can be induced by miRNAs secreted by cancer cells in the bone microenvironment.

  • cancer-secreted microRNA
  • osteoblastic bone metastasis
  • exosome
  • prostate cancer
  • bone microenvironment

Footnotes

  • 1To whom correspondence may be addressed. Email: takeda.phy2attmd.ac.jp or satoshin.phy2attmd.ac.jp.
  • Author contributions: A.O., C.A., T.O., M.F., S.T., and S. Sato designed research; K.H. and S. Sunamura performed research; K.H., H.O., S. Sunamura, N.K., Y.M., T.F., K.Y., H.K., K.A., and S. Sato analyzed data; and K.H. and S. Sato wrote the paper.

  • The authors declare no conflict of interest.

  • This article is a PNAS Direct Submission.

  • This article contains supporting information online at www.pnas.org/lookup/suppl/doi:10.1073/pnas.1717363115/-/DCSupplemental .

  • Copyright © 2018 the Author(s). Published by PNAS.

This open access article is distributed under Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives License 4.0 (CC BY-NC-ND) .

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Osteoblastic metastasis by cancer-secreted miR-940
Kyoko Hashimoto, Hiroki Ochi, Satoko Sunamura, Nobuyoshi Kosaka, Yo Mabuchi, Toru Fukuda, Kenta Yao, Hiroaki Kanda, Keisuke Ae, Atsushi Okawa, Chihiro Akazawa, Takahiro Ochiya, Mitsuru Futakuchi, Shu Takeda, Shingo Sato
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences Feb 2018, 201717363; DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1717363115









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On Campus with Kaino: Shingo Sato Workshop Jumpstarts Creative Thinking

Surface Design News
August 20, 2011

I discovered Shingo Sato’s unique take on fashion/surface design just as I was planning my MFA show this year. I needed to break a design-block that had dropped in on me like a thick London – or in this case Sacramento – Fog.

Seeking deeper instruction than his free YouTube videos provide, I was fortunate to attend a workshop with him on April 2, 2011 at the Hotel Rex in San Francisco. A cozy conference room provided quickly filled up with attendees, home sewing machines and pattern making tools ready to follow along with the Japanese designer’s complex-looking pattern process.

For the uninitiated, Shingo Sato is a fashion designer who sculpts using cloth as medium for his swirling reconstructions. Though Sato has achieved international fame, many are still unacquainted with this Japanese designer who frequents the highest circles of art & fashion. He applies his surface design aesthetic and methodology (called Transformational Reconstruction or “ TRpattern Design “) to pret-a-porter, haute couture and one -off custom designs sold worldwide (especially in Japan and Italy) under his own label.

In addition to his design mastery, Sato is a gifted instructor at many international colleges, such as London’s Central Saint Martins College of Art, Parsons Paris School of Art and Design, Milano Accademia Brera Belle d’Arte and Bunka Fashion College in Tokyo. Plus he (very notably) believes in sharing his inspirational teaching, which is why he has posted several fascinating YouTube videos for all to access at no cost.

Though I found the videos helpful, I decided to attend his first USA workshop, in part because it was made possible by SDA member Sandra Ericson (Director of the Center for Pattern Design – see below), a talented and highly acclaimed designer and workshop instructor in her own right. I had attended a previous workshop she offered with Julian Roberts, a British designer known for subtraction cutting methods. It was outstanding – so I knew Ericson excelled at identifying visionaries and making their workshops available.

Upon arriving at the workshop, I met my classmates-for-the-day. They included college professors, independent fashion designers, fashion designers for famous companies, other college students, and avid home sewers (mostly west coast + 2 from New York) which made for some great networking! Sato’s wit and humor won our hearts. Though his English was choppy and heavily accented, he clearly communicated his pattern making methods via the visual/universal language of the demo.

Follow the process via the tags on the images I’ve provided here. See Sato’s design toiles (muslin process samples) of a hood-ruff, a swirling skirt, and a bodice with heart sculpture. The YouTube link above shows how Sato creates one of his spectacular Origami Dresses.

Note how the surface design shapes are drawn directly on the muslin with sharpie or felt pen; then notches and numbers are added; then the intricate shapes are cut as muslin pattern pieces by adding seam allowances. These are taped together to check pattern accuracy quickly – without taking time for the tedious sewing stage and Viola!: Sato’s process for arriving at final patterns.

A finished dress is shown in at right. Note the classic bodice with sculpted seaming over lower torso. Sato reduced the complex-looking haute couture styles to single steps so the class could follow easily. He checked that each of us understood our first attempt at his TR method. You can check out more images from that workshop on the Center for Pattern Design website here .

Sato also offered tips to ease the difficulty of sewing the intricate curves and swirls of miniature convex and concave pattern pieces since we were working at half scale for the day. He was consistently humble in communicating his vision and meticulous about connecting his methods to existing/traditional pattern-making processes such as adding and subtracting fullness and manipulating darts. He repeatedly encouraged us to take his techniques and push them beyond the limits of his own work, reminding us that the possibilities are limitless.

My fog was lifted and I left the workshop re-inspired!

If you find yourself facing a creative block and have only a day or a weekend to spare, try any of the workshops offered by Center for Pattern Design. CPD’s events are rare educational/vocational treasures that spark inspiration – especially for surface designers interested in the sculptural nature of pattern-making. They very effectively deliver continuing education in short, powerful bursts!

Shingo Sato will be coming to USA/Bay area again in September (2011) to conduct more classes. Students will have another opportunity to design and complete a ‘TR’ (Transformational Reconstruction) garment. Check Center for Pattern Design website & newsletter for more information.

________________________
E. Kaino Hopper has just completed her MFA at the University of California/Davis. A seamstress for many years, she designs an award-winning clothing line called It Works For Me for women with both lowered and full mobility.

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Shingo Sato

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Shingo Sato2018-02-27milou & pilouhttp://www.milouandpilou.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/02/logobcnok.png200px200px
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A year ago I was gifted by a book from Shingo Sato  a Japanese designer and instructor. I had heard a lot about him and his techniques but I was immediately fascinated by his approach in designing a pattern called “Transformational Reconstruction“.

What is about?

His approach to design is not new, since we patternmakers know how to transfer darts , add style lines as well. But it all has its limits because drawing a pattern design on paper has less creative possibilities.

The design process called “Transformational Reconstruction” is done in 3D which gives so much more possibilities to be creative. He often uses wavy or geometric lines for a design but also builds a pattern using his “Architectural Reconstruction”. It is very similar to origami techniques.

Shingo Sato is holding many courses every year as he is a well-know teacher too. In his sessions mainly done in Milan and in vary Japanese schools you can learn:

  • Create advanced style lines in 3D on basic bodice, skirt and dress muslins.
  • The way to apply the ‘slash-and-spread’ technique method to the deconstructed pieces
  • How to combine pieces to create completely different garments with tangible, three-dimensional detail such as protruding geometric shapes, knots, and accordion folds

You have also many tutorials online if you are interested, as well as in his website.

http://www.youtube.com/user/trpattern

http://www.trpattern.com

 

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Showing 2 comments
  • sayil hernandez


    hola, me gustaria saber donde compraste el libro? y si es edicion en español, lo he buscado en muchas partes y no he podido obtener una repuesta positiva, agradeceria tu respuesta

    • admin


      Hola Sayil,
      Yo lo compré en la propia web hace bastante tiempo, está en inglés.
      Este es el link:
      https://www.centerforpatterndesign.com/products/transformational-reconstruction
      También lo puedes encontrar en amazon pero siempre o la versión en inglés o en japonés.
      Otra alternativa es mirar sus tutoriales en Youtube, creo que hay unos 34 diferentes, son una maravilla!
      Saludos!
      Alicia

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