What is your philosophy of education

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Philosophy of Education essay

PHILOSOPHY OF EDUCATION 1
Philosophy of Education
Philosophy of Education
Sarah Orr
University of Colorado Colorado Springs

PHILOSOPHY OF EDUCATION 2
Overview
Martin Luther King Jr. said “The function of education is to teach one to think intensi...

PHILOSOPHY OF EDUCATION 3
as well, including being mindful of different learning styles and creating an accepting, safe
en...

PHILOSOPHY OF EDUCATION 4
As for testing, I believe that tests should be structured to support the needs of all students,
...

PHILOSOPHY OF EDUCATION 5
models (VAMs) should be used in teacher evaluation systems. With teacher evaluation, Darling-
Ha...

PHILOSOPHY OF EDUCATION 6
feel this is occurring would likely not succeed in schools that permit those values. Therefore,
...

PHILOSOPHY OF EDUCATION 7
References
Author unknown. (2015-16). Rubric for Evaluating Colorado Teachers. Retrieved March 1...

PHILOSOPHY OF EDUCATION 8
Greene, J. (2015, May 6). Testimony to the Arkansas Common Core Council. [Web log post].
Retriev...

PHILOSOPHY OF EDUCATION 9
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Philosophy of Education essay

  1. 1.
    PHILOSOPHY OF EDUCATION 1
    Philosophy of Education
    Philosophy of Education
    Sarah Orr
    University of Colorado Colorado Springs

  2. 2.

    PHILOSOPHY OF EDUCATION 2
    Overview
    Martin Luther King Jr. said “The function of education is to teach one to think intensively
    and to think critically. Intelligence plus character – that is the goal of true education.” But how
    should educators teach students to think intensively and to think critically? Teachers have their
    own views of how students should be taught in school and what kinds of education work best.
    My view is most similar to a Social Reconstructionist perspective. Students should be taught not
    only about social problems in society, but they should also learn ways to solve them in the
    future. Although traditional values of teaching and the needs of the students are important, it is
    essential for students to learn that they are part of a system greater than themselves. One of the
    main goals of education is to get students ready for college and the working world. In particular,
    American society needs intelligent, responsible citizens who are aware of themselves and the
    world around them. The curriculum, qualities of a good teacher and school choice are factors that
    play a role in education and awareness of society.
    My Philosophy
    Education is important for students, because it helps them formulate their beliefs and
    encourages them to become active members of society. As American journalist Sydney Harris
    said “the purpose of education is to turn mirrors into windows.” Education opens windows; it
    provides individuals with the tools to succeed in life. However, in order for students to learn
    about society or any subject, their personal needs must be met. As described in Maslow’s
    Hierarchy of Needs, one need must be met before an individual can move on to another. It is
    difficult for a student to learn if they are struggling emotionally, socially, or academically. When
    I become a teacher, I want to give students the support they need to succeed. This would include
    extended time on tests, tutoring, and help with school work. Social considerations would be met

  3. 3.

    PHILOSOPHY OF EDUCATION 3
    as well, including being mindful of different learning styles and creating an accepting, safe
    environment for the students.
    As a teacher, I want to help all students feel successful, regardless of their backgrounds
    and abilities. Therefore, my view fits with the Social Reconstructionist perspective. According to
    David Sadker and Karen Zittleman, authors of Teachers, Schools and Society (2016), Social
    Reconstructionism encourages schools, teachers, and students to focus their studies and energies
    on alleviating pervasive social inequities and, as the name implies, reconstruct society into a new
    and more just social order. Although this philosophy emphasizes the needs of students, the
    teacher plays an important part as a role model for the students. The teacher’s job is to “explore
    social problems, suggest alternative perspectives, and facilitate student analysis of these
    problems” (Sadker & Zittleman, 2016). By having the students and teachers working together,
    everyone can learn how to live in a democratic culture (Sadker & Zittleman, 2016).
    In regards to the curriculum, I believe that educators and school boards should figure out
    how to improve it, so that it fits the needs of all the students. Allie Bidwell states that the
    Common Core standards “lay out what students should know and be able to do by each grade”
    (Bidwell, 2014). Many of the topics in the reading and writing portions of the Common Core
    reflect European American values of colonial times. As a result, students who do not share those
    values may feel left behind. Jay P. Greene claims that “A fundamental problem with national
    standards efforts, like Common Core, is that they are attempting to impose a single vision of a
    proper education on a large and diverse country with differing views” (Greene, 2015). In
    addition, some teachers may not agree with the material that is being presented by the Common
    Core. They may be disappointed that the Common Core de-emphasizes other important subjects
    like art, science, history, and physical education.

  4. 4.

    PHILOSOPHY OF EDUCATION 4
    As for testing, I believe that tests should be structured to support the needs of all students,
    including students with special needs. Although having high educational standards is beneficial
    for preparing students for the workforce, the way the tests are structured needs to be improved.
    When students with different learning styles struggle with math and English on the tests, they
    will not get good scores. As stated by Sadker and Zittleman, “…holding identical expectations
    for all students place the poorer ones at a disadvantage” (Sadker, Zittleman, 297). Many poor
    students do not have access to resources such as textbooks and technology, to help them succeed.
    These standards have contributed to the achievement gap between white wealthy students and
    students who face the obstacles of race, class, and/or ability. This is one of the reasons why it is
    important to be aware of the testing standards and find ways to improve them. This leads back to
    the value of addressing students about educational and societal issues.
    In order for students to learn the material, there must be good teachers. As such, there
    must be methods for evaluating teachers. One method is evaluating by observation. On the 2015-
    2016 rubric for evaluating Colorado teachers, one requirement states “teachers demonstrate
    mastery of and pedagogical expertise in the content they teach” (mainly mathematics and
    literacy). According to the rubric, “effective teachers…have the knowledge, skills and
    commitments needed to provide excellent and equitable learning opportunities and growth for all
    students.” (2015-16). When teachers are properly evaluated, administrators can figure out what
    they are doing well, or what they need to do to improve the next time. Effective teachers present
    the required material in an organized way, in a clear and caring manner, while also providing
    support for their students.
    Another method of evaluation is by the calculation of student achievement, mainly by
    scores on standardized tests. According to Linda Darling-Hammond, tools such as Value-added

  5. 5.

    PHILOSOPHY OF EDUCATION 5
    models (VAMs) should be used in teacher evaluation systems. With teacher evaluation, Darling-
    Hammond states that “Value-added models (VAMs) for examining gains in student test scores
    from one year to the next are promoted as tools to accomplish this goal” (Darling-Hammond,
    2011). I believe that teachers should be evaluated by a combination of observation and student
    achievement. Evaluating by observations is beneficial because it shows what teachers need to
    improve on in different areas. Jay P. Greene claims “…I’d probably want to evaluate teachers
    using a mixture of student test score gains, classroom observations, and feedback from parents,
    students, and other staff” (Greene, 2013). Evaluating by test scores is beneficial because it
    provides measurement of student growth that can be used to help teachers improve. However, I
    do not think that evaluating by test scores should be a top priority. Diane Ravitch claims that
    teachers and students perform more than standardized tests reveal and she says that evaluation
    models like VAM, “leads to a narrowed curriculum, teaching to the test, and cheating” (Ravitch,
    2014). As a teacher, I would want to be observed by students, principals and other officials so
    that I would know what areas to improve in, such as Productivity and Positive Climate from a
    rubric (Harme, Pianta, Karen and Para, 2012). One of the most important qualities on which
    teachers should be evaluated is how they respect and support their students.
    In order for students to learn, they need to feel like they are in a comfortable learning
    environment. This is one reason why I find school choice to be important. Preparing students for
    the workforce and exposing them to society’s values is one of the main goals of education.
    However, from a Social Reconstructionist perspective, there is another side that is more
    oppressive. To some people, “schools generally teach the poorer classes to accept their lowly
    stations in life, to be subservient to authority, to unquestioningly follow the rules while laboring
    for the economic benefit of the rich” (Sadker and Zittleman, 2016). Students and families who

  6. 6.

    PHILOSOPHY OF EDUCATION 6
    feel this is occurring would likely not succeed in schools that permit those values. Therefore,
    parents should be given the opportunities to send their children to schools they think work best
    for them.
    There are a variety of programs that are used for school choice. According to the
    Friedman Foundation, an Empowerment Scholarship Account (ESA) is a program that allows
    parents to remove their children from public schools and allows access to their funding to help
    pay for tutoring, private school tuition and other services. Friedman believed that competition
    would produce better schools and his voucher plan attempted to “give every family the same
    choice the wealthy enjoyed” (Sadker and Zittleman, 2016). However, like many other programs,
    ESA is not beneficial for everyone. Diane Ravitch quotes Education News Network and states
    “ESAs will erode already inadequate funding and budgets, reduce essential education resources,
    widen achievement gaps and increase segregation” (Ravitch, 2015). I believe that school choice
    should be available, but the issue of the achievement gap should be addressed. School choice is
    beneficial, but it does not solve the race, class, and ability problems. Ravitch claims that
    “Addressing the causes of low test scores is the answer, and choice does not address the causes
    of low test scores: poverty and segregation” (Ravitch, 2013). Once again, this relates to the
    values of Social Reconstructionism in education.
    As teachers in society, I believe that it is our job to inspire students to learn about a
    variety of subjects, become active members of society, and encourage them to make a difference
    in their community. We should encourage individuals to set aside their “mirrors” and open up a
    window to the world. As a teacher, I believe that the education system needs to start valuing
    students of all backgrounds and abilities, to help them maximize their unique talents and skills.
    This is why I believe in Social Reconstructionism.

  7. 7.

    PHILOSOPHY OF EDUCATION 7
    References
    Author unknown. (2015-16). Rubric for Evaluating Colorado Teachers. Retrieved March 15
    2016 from https://bb.uccs.edu/bbcswebdav/pid-2443218-dt-content-rid-
    9424254_2/courses/2161_CUSPG_CURR_4800_SEC001_MASTER/2015-
    16%20CO%20Teacher%27s%20Rubric.pdf?target=blank
    Bidwell, A. (2014). The History of Common Core State Standards. USNews.com. (n.p). Retrieved
    22 February 2016 from http://www.usnews.com/news/special-
    reports/articles/2014/02/27/the-history-of-common-core-state-standards
    Darling-Hammond, L., Amrein-Beardsley, A., Haertel, E., & Rothstein, J. (2011, September
    14). Getting Teacher Evaluation Right: A Background Paper for Policy Makers.
    Retrieved March 12 2016 from https://bb.uccs.edu/bbcswebdav/pid-2376098-dt-content-
    rid-
    9045710_2/courses/2161_CUSPG_CURR_4800_SEC001_MASTER/2161_CUSPG_CU
    RR_4800_SEC001_MASTER_ImportedContent_20160105112857/New%20Logo%20R
    esearch%20on%20Teacher%20Evaluation%20AERA-NAE%20Briefing.pdf
    Friedman Foundation. (n.d). Arizona—Empowerment Savings Accounts. Retrieved April 21 2016
    from http://www.edchoice.org/school-choice/programs/arizona-empowerment-
    scholarship-accounts/
    Greene, J. (2013, January 9). Understanding the Gates Foundation’s Measuring Effective
    Teachers Project. [Web log post]. Retrieved March 11 2016 from
    http://jaypgreene.com/2013/01/09/understanding-the-gates-foundations-measuring-
    effective-teachers-project/

  8. 8.

    PHILOSOPHY OF EDUCATION 8
    Greene, J. (2015, May 6). Testimony to the Arkansas Common Core Council. [Web log post].
    Retrieved from http://jaypgreene.com/2015/05/04/testimony-to-the-arkansas-common-
    core-council/
    Ravitch, D. (2013, March 29). Vouchers Don’t Work: Evidence from Milwaukee. [Web log post].
    Retrieved April 3 2016 from http://dianeravitch.net/2013/03/29/vouchers-dont-work-
    evidence-from-milwaukee/
    Ravitch, D. (2014, January). Why VAM Is a Sham. [Web log post]. Retrieved March 11 2016
    from http://dianeravitch.net/2014/01/19/why-vam-is-a-sham-2/
    Ravitch, D. (2015, July 14). Nevada: School Choice Harms Kids in Public Schools. [Web log
    post]. Retrieved April 3 2016 from http://dianeravitch.net/2015/07/14/nevada-school-
    choice-harms-kids-in-public-schools/
    Sadker, D. M., & Zittleman, K.R. (2016). Teachers schools and society: a brief introduction to
    education (4 ed.). New York, NY: McGraw-Hill Education. Print.

  9. 9.

    PHILOSOPHY OF EDUCATION 9

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Educational Philosophy Paper EDUC 604.docx

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Running head: Educational Philosophy
1
No challenge too large, No victory too small
Heather M. Greene
ID# 22270194
EDUC 604
Dr. James Fyock
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Running head: Educational Philosophy
2
Abstract
My personal philosophy for education is that, I desire to work with children of all ages, ethnic
backgrounds and abilities.
I want to be able to work in a classroom setting with individuals to
where I can assist them to find the best within themselves.
I know I may not change the world
overnight, but I can at-least try one child at a time.
My goal as a teacher is to make sure I make a
lasting impression on my students, so when they look back at their teachers they will think of me
and how I cared for them in every way I could.
Introduction
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Running head: Educational Philosophy
3
Having an education philosophy is a very important thing to have as a teacher.
Your
philosophy let’s other’s know what you stand for and what to expect from you as a teacher.
I
believe as part of an education philosophy you should always remember to have these
characteristics to follow, they are found in Galatians 5:22-23 it says, “But the fruit of the Spirit is
love, joy, peace, longsuffering, gentleness, goodness, faith, Meekness, temperance: against such
there is no law (Galatians 5:22-23 NKJV)”.
These are the characteristics of Jesus and we are His
followers, so we should be displaying the Fruit of the Spirit as teachers.
You can entwine these
into your education philosophy.
There are many good philosophers that helped mold the
education realm and that held high standards for education.
We are going to look a little deeper
into what the philosophy of the philosophers were and what my own person philosophy on
education is.
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Running head: Educational Philosophy
4
There are many types of education philosophies in our world today such as, idealism, realism,
Neo-Scholasticism, Progressivism, Deism, Liberalism and Naturalism.
The philosophy that I
would best fall under is progressivism.
John Dewey was the main person who came up with
progressivism.
Dewey got some of his progressive ideas from Frobel who was a German
philosopher and Pestalozzi who was a Swiss educator (StateUniversity.com, 2014).
What Dewey
liked about them is that they educated the “whole child,” by moving beyond just the textbooks to
learn, but educated students upon their needs and interest (StateUniversity.com, 2014).
I am a
firm believer that no one student learns the same way.
Some students might only be able to learn
by being hands on with something, some might learn by being read to, and some might just need
you to teach them totally out of the box.
This is what progressivism believes and that is why I
would pick that philosophy to fit me best.
Students need someone who is going to learn how they learn best.
There’s that old saying
treat others like you want to be treated, I literally take that saying to heart, even in my teaching.
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